Do’s and Don’t of playing RPGs, pay attention or you’ll just pay

Role Playing Games or RPGs as they are known has captivated many gamers, games like Dragon Quest VIII and Final Fantasy X are still favorites that people play today; myself included. Incidentally, playing an RPG meant always being prepared for the unexpected because there was always a bigger enemy or one that had more bite than your average.

However, it is without a doubt that playing any Role Playing Game can be a little overwhelming especially with everything that has to be done in the game. Many gamers do not realize that they can potentially make life in that game difficult for themselves when they try to do something that does not work such as level grinding and not exploring their environment.

Doing both of these can lead to monumental problems down the road and being an avid gamer, I have experienced this. It is not hard to play these games, but its not easy either; sometimes it seems easier to give up, but its worth it not to. There are very simple rules when playing RPGs.

Don’t Level Grind

This is a common theme for most gamers when they play Role Playing Games because they feel it is warranted when their characters get overwhelmed and end up dying as a result. Most RPGs make it so characters can go through the entire game without much difficulty. This also works in many of the massive multiplayer online role playing games.

Chrono Trigger

So having said that, level grinding isn’t necessary because the game practically hands you everything you need and tells you exactly what to do despite how obvious it’s not. You can walk around the environment while looking for treasure chests or running errands for a NPC (Non-playable character) and gain the levels needed to battle enemies with minimal trouble hence making level grinding unnecessary.

I’ve played where I have run around in a circle trying to get my party stronger or strong enough to the point where my characters will only have to strike the enemy no more than twice to destroy them, it was always enough get me through every RPG game until I learned that I was doing it all wrong.

Incidentally, there more than enough battles in this type of game where gamers do not need to stay in one area and kill the same ones. Often times, enemies in later levels aren’t any stronger than the ones that the gamer are fighting at the level they are at or in the area they are in.

Explore, explore, explore!

Many gamers have come to the conclusion that a certain amount of exploration is necessary in order to fully understand what is going on in the game. A lot of times, its worth it to explore everything because you never know what you’ll find. Ten times out of ten, you find so much more when you make the time to investigate everything even certain things that might seem as if it is out of place or does not completely belong within a certain place.

Dragon Quest VIII

You can see a dragon with an axe standing in front of a treasure chest or standing in front of a doorway into another room and wonder why its standing there or you might even be told of a HP Regenerator that’s somewhere in the dungeon area from someone in town and they speak of a powerful artifact. Looking around can make a gamer knowledgeable about that area or certain landmarks within that area.

One of the worst things that you can ever do is run through an area without giving it your full attention which requires you to go into every room, fall down every pit and even run off the beaten path to investigate other things in that area; keep this in mind always

A battle fought is a battle won

Many gamers are aware of the fact that they can’t always win every battle, but fighting a lot of battles in the game will make your characters strong; unarguably. Running from battles is only necessary if the enemy is killing your characters with one hit. This is a fear that gamers can put to bed as long as they do not venture to places where enemies are stronger than their characters.

Participating and fighting every battle is can be a little tedious sometimes, but gamers learn a lot about their enemies when they participate in battle. For example, a lot of enemies usually expose an elemental weakness that they have and that gamers can exploit thereby making that enemy easier to kill for easy experience points. The point is that being in battle a lot is a lesson all on its own; a lesson that gamers would do well to heed.

Dragon Quest VIII

Another benefit to fighting in battles is that it gives gamers a chance to regain a little life and magic power. For example, one or possibly two of your characters have a skill or ability that allows them to siphon magic points from the enemies which goes a long way when you are miles from the nearest town or save point. This is a lifesaver and has pulled me out of the fire tons of times.

Pay attention

More times than not, there is always something that a NPC will mention that might seem a little off or does not quite add up; it can be said that there’s some hidden meaning to what it is they are saying. In which case, giving them your undivided attention will more than likely help you understand what it is they are trying to say or tell you or point you in the right direction.

Dragon Quest VIII

Also, this pays off in dungeon or even town areas where you’re looking for something specific that cannot be ordinarily found off the bat. Don’t think that there isn’t more to what you see when you enter places because when you pay attention, you can spot just about anything. Sometimes there are things in the background that stands out to you and could be the means of destroying a tough enemy so keep your eyes peeled.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, following these simple rules when playing RPGs will make your journey through them fun and you’ll learn a lot in the process which goes a long way in that game and others like it.

8 Replies to “Do’s and Don’t of playing RPGs, pay attention or you’ll just pay”

  1. I used to play RPG games not too long ago, something I used to do is to explore as much as I could and collect all the money I could and special items. Especially in the early stages of the game, the stronger you start the better you end.
    Good post for people that play RPG games indeed.

  2. Nice blog post. I got the RPG bug many years ago… back in 1985 when I went over to friend’s house and watched him play The Bard’s Tale on a C64. I was hooked.

    Played a lot of RPGs over the years, probably my favorite game genre. In fact a few years ago I even started to learn to make video games using Construct 2 and RPG Maker.

    Anyway – keep up the good work!

    TD

    1. Hey TD, thanks for the compliment. I love RPGs too and I have been playing them since the first Legend of Zelda, if that can be considered an RPG. My favorite RPG is Chrono Trigger; it was the first real RPG that I ever played that really did a good job getting me into the game. I was playing it a few months ago, I’ve been playing Chrono Trigger since I was 15 because I’m that into it; I’m 37 and I still love playing the game; I even developed my own strategies for it. Overall, I love RPGs.

  3. The Elder Scrolls series, mainly with Morrowind, taught me to really pay attention to what a NPC is telling you. You could miss an important piece of information for the next quest if you don’t!

    I appreciate it when a game is balanced enough to the point where level grinding doesn’t become an issue. Or like in something like Witcher 3 where I always feel like I need to go kill more monsters or complete more quests to level up… it kind of goes both ways

    1. I used to be big on grinding in RPGs, it was not until I was playing Wild Arms 5 that I realized that level grinding was not necessary because you’ll get into battles consistently which will level you up faster. The big thing is to play the game and ignore level grinding because sometimes the only thing needed to get past a boss isn’t how many levels you are but the items, spells and/or techniques that you have at present.

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